Andrea Ramolo: The Shadows And The Cracks

Andrea Ramolo

Thorniac/independent

 

Toronto’s Andrea Ramolo isn’t one for staying still too long. When on the road, which is often, she plays between 250-300 dates a year. Having cut her teeth on the folk scene playing with the likes of Jim Cuddy and Fred Eaglesmith and released a folkified debut album (Thank You For The Ride), it’s no surprise that the followup is something very different.


The album art’s a good indicator. The New Age girl in the floral print running through the meadow from ‘Thank You For The Ride’ is now all tattered jeans, skimpy undershirt holding up a lantern in a dark barn, almost daring you to come in.


Hot, real hot and totally in step with Ramolo’s new Joplinesque persona,  stompin’ and heavy breathing all over the tracks on ‘The Shadows and The Cracks’. Produced by Tim Thorney, who’s been this way before with Alanis Morissette, the album’s a good mix of radio-friendly alt blues rock and tunes designed to spotlight the lady’s pipes, nicely curated by Thorney who comes up with a mix that’s now-sounding enough to dodge the retro bullet.


The standard guitar, bass, drums and keys line-up keeps the rock moving along at a decent clip and backing vocalist Cindy Doire ups the flavour ante whenever she’s on the mic but it's all about Andrea and how she sells the tunes. And sell ‘em she can. 


Apart from a couple of slower tracks, likely intended as bridging devices between the albums, Ramolo rips it to the bone, especially on ‘Freedom In America’, ‘Oh Brother’ and hitbound single ‘Whole Life Running’


Andrea Ramolo plays Toronto’s Great hall Mar.30


Lenny Stoute