MAE MOORE: Folklore: Poetical License

Mae Moore

Having gone back to the land ten years ago, pop singer Mae Moore now returns to music in a mood as mellow as you’d expect from an organic farmer on B.C.'s Gulf Islands.

And with likely very different expectations too. The likeable melodies and pop-centric style, which drew Juno nominations, chart hits and a spot on the movie Top Gun’s soundtrack is absent here. 

In its place, the title says it all. Moore came out of the university folk scene and returns to her roots here bringing a worldly sensibility, which informs without being overwrought. New to the mix is a greater confidence in messing about with jazz elements, especially in the arrangements.

When the brass and strings come in, it’s more likely through a side door, reinforcing the jazz/folk meld and bringing to mind that other famous painting, folk jazzing Lady of the Canyon.

Ok, the dulcimer doesn’t help in setting her apart; what does is that Mooré’s vocals is less idiosyncratic than Mitchell’s, in a good way

The production is tasteful, the arrangements inclusive, the environmentally centered lyrics often served with a twist of wry. Check ‘ When Constellations Align’, a tune about a love so large it takes the Milky Way to serve as appropriate canopy 

That kind of towering viewpoint is at work on most of the album, sort of peaking on ‘Ok, Canada’ by tugging at the heart while narrowly avoiding overblown lyrics. A notable exception is the uptempo and pointedly ambiguous ‘My One And Only One’

Major Canrock points to Moore for taking Folklore on tour via Via Rail from Victoria to P.E.I. in the month of March. It’s good to hear Mae’s back.

James Lizzard