LAMONT JAMES
: Poppies


Lamont James

Monster Records

Despite doing thousands of gigs as a touring sideman for most of his career, multi-instrumentalist Lamont James has settled down to create a debut album that harkens back to AM Radio’s Sunshine Pop era. The genre was defined by light, bouncy and almost naïve music whose acts – Vanity Fare, Edison Lighthouse, 1910 Fruitgum Company, and Ohio Express – were studio concoctions.

Lamont comes from the less contrived and more honest power pop fields farmed by the likes of The Association, Gilbert O’Sullivan, Big Star and even Burt Bacharach.

That isn’t to say the songs are complete throwbacks to the late ‘60s or early ‘70s, only that they recall a time when men wearing their hearts on their sleeves were considered sensitive poets and not some Metrosexual gender/genre bending marketing shill. The first six songs – “Today”, “Sorry”, “Beat Sauce”, “Sun Brings You Home”, “Song of You”, and “Maisie” could easily be a faultless Power/Sunshine Pop EP on its own. However, Lamont breaks out of the confines of straight up pop and begins experimenting with the genre on the description defying “Kauzendux” and the preciously short atmospheric guitar piece “Traveler” followed by the Pink Floydian “Sunday” featuring a speech from Sir Ralph Richardson called “Frost At Night” as counterpoint to Lamont’s psychedelic mantra “…what a wonderful world”.

ames even throws a non-typical pop rock song into the mix from Hamilton’s legendary punk act Teenage Head as not only an homage but a showcase for the song’s POP sensibilities and his deft interpretation.

lamontjames.com

Jaimie Vernon