March 2011

TERRY SUMSION:1947-2011

Terry Sumsion

By Rob Butterworth

Canada and the Canadian music community have lost a legend.  Terry Sumsion of Harley, Ontario passed away on Saturday, March 26, 2011 at the age of 64, following a courageous three-year battle with esophageal cancer.

Terry’s name and music are known nationwide in Canada and through the British Isles and Europe.  Playing to sell-out audiences up until early this year, Terry’s hearty sense of humor and strong rapport with his friends and fans, new and old, always created a relaxed and enjoyable entertainment experience.  Terry was best known for hits like “Our Lovin’ Place” and “Midnight Invitation”.

Terry leaves behind his loving wife Jeannie, daughter Tammy and son Jeff.  He also leaves behind a score of fans but most important to Terry himself, a very close and dear group of friends.  Over the past year Terry accomplished two major goals that were important in his life – his treasured tour bus and his final CD (“Encore”) released just last week.

Terry Sumsion, the songwriter and musician, was a Canadian treasure.  To his family and friends he was so much more and he will be sorely missed.  His last CD entitled “Encore” had an alternate title – “Friendship Train”, also a song in the collection.  It was Terry’s way of saying thank you to all of his friends and fans all of whom supported him throughout his illness and always with his music.  

MAE MOORE: Folklore: Poetical License

Mae Moore

Having gone back to the land ten years ago, pop singer Mae Moore now returns to music in a mood as mellow as you’d expect from an organic farmer on B.C.'s Gulf Islands.

And with likely very different expectations too. The likeable melodies and pop-centric style, which drew Juno nominations, chart hits and a spot on the movie Top Gun’s soundtrack is absent here. 

In its place, the title says it all. Moore came out of the university folk scene and returns to her roots here bringing a worldly sensibility, which informs without being overwrought. New to the mix is a greater confidence in messing about with jazz elements, especially in the arrangements.

When the brass and strings come in, it’s more likely through a side door, reinforcing the jazz/folk meld and bringing to mind that other famous painting, folk jazzing Lady of the Canyon.

Ok, the dulcimer doesn’t help in setting her apart; what does is that Mooré’s vocals is less idiosyncratic than Mitchell’s, in a good way

The production is tasteful, the arrangements inclusive, the environmentally centered lyrics often served with a twist of wry. Check ‘ When Constellations Align’, a tune about a love so large it takes the Milky Way to serve as appropriate canopy 

Japan Benefit Concert

Yoko and Sean Ono

Japan Benefit Concert (Miller Theatre at Columbia University, NY) Sunday, March 27, 2011, 8:00 PM

.11.11 as it is being called was the worst earthquake in 100‘s of years and was so powerful it moved the earth 6.5’.

Japan the Golden eagle of the Pacific Rim is devasted as its wings have been clipped by tsunamis and a potential nuclear disaster.

Who better to lead the call for help  but Yoko and Sean not only to raise funds for the overwhelmed country but also to create awareness as so many are displaced and the humble people of Japan are in need.

What better way then the universal gift of music.

Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, Sonic Youth, Mike Patton, Cibo Matto, Mephista, Marc Ribot, Uri Caine, Aleph Trio, John Zorn, host

More than a dozen innovative artists at the intersection of indie rock, contemporary jazz, and avant-garde performance will come together at Miller Theatre to present a benefit concert to support recovery efforts in Japan. “The tragedy and devastation is really overwhelming,” says John Zorn, who has organized and will host the evening. “I’ve always felt a strong personal connection to Japan, and I’m just glad to be able to do my part to help. It should be an amazing night.”

For the full story:

www.imaginepeace.com

Firkins Canadian Pub Tour

Firkin

Nor need you mind the serial ordeal
Of being watched from forty cellar holes
As if by eye pairs out of forty firkins.

Robert Frost "Directive"

A firkin is an old English unit of volume. The name is derived from the Middle Dutch word vierdekijn, which means fourth, i.e. a quarter of a full-size barrel.

For Beer and Ale a firkin is equal to nine Imperial Gallons, seventy-two pints, or a quarter of a barrel (40.91481 litres). Casks in this size (themselves called firkins) are the most common container for cask ale. A firkin is equal to half a kilderkin.

So be it, however Cashbox heard that a Firkin is also a band from Hungary that plays Irish music, with a twist of punk thrown into the barrel just for the swirl of it.

So we sent our young budding Hungarian journalist and his lady to go and check it out here on their Canadian tour.

Thursday March 17, 2011 

Firkins Canadian Pub Tour 

Hungarian Irish Punk Band  “FIRKIN “ St Patties Day 

Lee’s Palace. Toronto, ON 

By: Jonathon Jager 

The day before I was informed about this band, and being of Hungarian decent I had to check this out, a Hungarian Irish Punk Band!! 

E-City-“Beyond the Dawn"

E-City

Label: Wizard Records  Indie

 

The first thing that grabs you on the first cut “Pages” is the crispness of the drums, then the guitars kick in, and finally the strength of the vocals. Reminiscent of Jefferson Airplane, and sometimes Jim Morrison, with guitar licks that mirror The Allman Brothers, any rock fan would love to have this  CD for their collection.

 

The second cut starts off with “Lonesome Midnight Train”, a sassy show-off guitar solo that has memories of Hendrix in it, which is certainly not a bad thing. “Down in the Delta” once again shows off the talent of drummer Pat Saraceno, with interesting rhythms that augment a great rock song.

 

‘Keep The Traffic Movin’” has a swampy, guitar riff intro, and strong vocals, while “One More Blues” goes in a whole other direction, with that John Mayall feel. “Sea Of Despair” speaks for itself about the loss of love and feeling lost and trying to find your way back ‘home’. “Riding a Wave” takes you back to the rock feel this band does best, with great mixtures of drums and guitar. 

 

“Can’t Blame the Fool” has a more melodic feel than the other tunes, with a Santana-like rhythm  and great background vocals ‘answering’ the lyrics. “Blondie” is the most commercial tune on the CD, although there isn’t a tune on this CD under 4 minutes. The ten tune offering ends “Soundtrack”, a haunting instrumental that truly shows off the musicianship of this trio.