June 2011

We Are Devo: Rocks NXNE

Devo 9

By Bill Delingat

Who can forget the “flower pot men” first sighted in the 80’s, well actually they were a group of students from Akron ,OHIO and they weren’t flower pots on the heads but “Devo Energy Domes” which, still today along with their new age sneakers, are still a big part of their merchandise.

Devo originally formed in 1973 and by 1980 had a hit with the single "Whip It’, and has maintained a cult following throughout its existence. Their style, a Sci - Fi, industrial art rock gave us the robotic musical look at their future.  The name "Devo" comes from their concept of de-evolution - the idea that instead of continuing to evolve, mankind has actually begun to regress, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society.

Devo caught the attention of David Bowie, who loved the group and secured a record contract for them with Warner Brothers. Brian Eno, of Roxy Music Fame, produced their hit album “Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!”.  That spawned remixes of hits like Mongoloid and the Stones “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction” and then the ional exposure with an appearance on Saturday Night Live, only a week  after the Rolling Stones, with Devo  performing "Satisfaction" and "Jocko Homo."

With a new CD released in 2010 “Something for everybody”, Devo is back out on the road and made a stop in Toronto at Dundas Square on June 18th for NXNE.

Music Matters for July 1st 2011: My NXNE Awards and a Canada Day Untold Story of Rock.

Music Matters

Canada Day. A celebration I hold very dear because of my love for this, my chosen home and, in my opinion, the best place to live on this tired old mudball. Apparently, a lot of people agree with me from all over the world. We are a diverse people who have come here from all over the globe to be Canadians. We choose to be here, our cultures are welcome here, and we live for the most part, in multi-part, multi-cultural harmony.

When asked, I tell people I am Canarican and live in the greatest country in the world. Sometimes, I think we should be called The United Provinces of Canada. That’s a name that sounds as awesome as we are. The good old UPC…our home and native land has a nice ring to it, don’t you think? Makes us sound bad-ass, too. Jordan JohnJordan JohnWe are united in our desire to live free and well, and at the same time allowed to keep our cultures in tntact while we enjoy the cultures of our friends and neighbors. I can have Canadian bacon and eggs for breakfast, a taco for lunch, a plate of manicotti for dinner and order Chinese food late at night. I can take the TTC to neighborhoods that are unique yet buttressed up against one another. You can walk down Bloor, or Dundas, or College Street, or many other Toronto arteries and tour the whole world, and all of Canada is much the same way.

WAYNE BUTTERY’S GOT THE SUMMERTIME BLUES. IN A GOOD WAY

Wayne Buttery 1

Story: Lenny Stoute

Once you go Bananas you never go back. Just ask blues man Wayne Buttery who’s made a career on its appeal. Buttery broke into the Toronto music scene in the Sixties as part of the Canadian Blue-Eyed Soul Invasion, which included acts Tony Flaim, George Oliver and Johnny Wright. All those cats were singers though and Wayne was content to wail on guitar for the moment. In the early Seventies he stepped up the act by co-founding a 50s nostalgia act called Bananas and helped move them in a short space of time to being the best known band of their kind in all of Canada. At first, Wayne wasn’t singing and didn’t really care all that much until the night the singer didn’t show for a gig.

“ We did a quick check and as I was the only one who knew all the lyrics, I was it. It was three songs before my knees stopped knocking and then after that I started getting cocky”.

With Wayne now the lead singer, the Bananas appeal soared and toured all across Canada and into the US for the rest of the decade, along the way playing with stellar blues acts of the period including Wilson Pickett, Muddy Waters, Dutch Mason, James Cotton, Gary ‘U.S.’ Bonds and like that.

Of course, all good things come to an end. Or not.

BIG SUGAR: Revolution Per Minute

Big Sugar

Bread And Water

So Gordie Johnson relocates to Texas and the reggae groove on Big Sugar gets deeper? Maybe Gordie was missing the band’s early years in the T.Dot when they first started mixing up electric blues with reggae grooves.

This first Big Sugar album in 8 years sure sounds like it.

Last year Gordie Johnson took time out from his country-metal project Grady to play a clutch of show with a hastily reunited Big Sugar. The experience was sweet enough to entice the crew back into the studio for a ‘reunion’ album, a concept that doesn’t often end with the best results.
Revolution Per Minute is not one of those. Instead, it’s everything you’ve ever liked about Big Sugar and more.

Michelle Wright Answers the Call of the Hall!

Cover July 1, 2011

By Don Graham

Canada's country songbird and ambassador of all things good about Canadian entertainers, is poised to receive one of Canadian country music's highest honour. Michelle Wright will be inducted at the Gala Industry Event on Sun Sept 11 at the Hamilton Convention Centre into the CCMA Hall of Fame. On this historical occasion at the Canadian Country Music Association's annual event,  Michelle Wright will take her rightful place in Canadian music history.

In 1985, while performing in a Hamilton bar, Michelle was discovered by producer Brian Ferriman. Ferriman was so impressed with her deep alto voice that the pair signed a recording and management deal that has lasted 25 years, and now it is fitting that Hamilton is the place where she will be bestowed with this prestigious honour in the country music scene.

Speaking with Michelle from her home outside of Nashville, I could sense how centered and content she is with her life right now and how happy she is with the direction she has taken. Her reaction to the induction was simple and direct, "I don't think the reality of it will hit  me until the induction but it is truly an honour to be included in the list of such people and musical icons of Canadian talent."