August 2013

Ice Breaker Rocks Sudbury SummerFest

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Submitted by Paul Kazulak
Photo Credits: Paul Kazulak Photography

Saturday August 27, 2013 was a beautiful summer day in Sudbury, Ontario, during Greater Sudbury’s annual SummerFest Music Festival, a four day event full of music and fun in Bell Park on the shores of Ramsey Lake.

Ice Breaker took the stage and spectacularly covered a demanding mix of Rock and Classic Rock tunes such as Heart’s ‘Barracuda’, Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Go your Own Way’, hard rockers like Def Leppard’s `Animal’, Motley Crue’s ‘Kickstart My Heart’ and Van Halen’s ‘Hot for Teacher’ where Carter Morin takes an Eddie Van Halen-ish inspired journey up and down the fret board, running scales and bending notes, totally wowing the audience. This up and coming group of talented musicians broke the ice at SummerFest.

The previous weekend Ice Breaker electrified the crowd at Rock and Roar Spanish as they opened for Coney Hatch, Lee Aaron, and Loverboy. They won that spot in the “Battle of the Bands” in April.

A mix of four adults, Allan Zoldy (keyboard/Lead and Background Vocals) Scott Zoldy (Drums), Denis Chaperon (Lead and Rythm Guitar)  and three students, Cole Szantol  (Bass) and Taylor Bovin-Brawley (Keyboards/Lead/Background Vocals) and prodigy, young Carter Morin (lead guitar).

Celtic Meets Country in Canada – Bold Steps Dancers

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Submitted by Sandy Graham

As we are fast approaching The Beach Celtic Festival on September 7 & 8 in Kew Gardens, Toronto,  I wanted to pay homage to a Scottish Canadian choreographer and her dancers, who have managed to take highland dancing, Ottawa step dancing and weave it into a country music song, all while maintaining  the roots of songs and steps.

Most of us have had the experience of bagpipes and highland dancers at some point at either a parade, wedding or festival. What drew my attention to The Bold Step Dancers was the unique choreography the do, especially to the showstopper of ‘Devil Went Down to Georgia’, the Charlie Daniels Band hit. The song talks of a competition between the fiddler and the devil dueling it out musically; Bold Steps takes it one step further by dueling it out with their performance.

Meghan Bold credits her teacher, Rae MacCulloch as the inspiration who taught her to love the art of dance. “I travelled internationally with the troupe, places like Spain, Mexico, Disneyland, all over the US, Ontario and Quebec. I began teaching at 15 years old and I have loved it ever since.”

Green Shoe Studios Collaborates with 96 year old to Record ‘Oh Sweet Lorraine’

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Submitted by Sandy Graham

With people waiting to get married later in life, and second time around marriages, and even more divorces than ever in this world, the fact that Fred and Lorraine Stobaugh were married for 75 years is astounding.  The day after she died, her husband sat alone in his Peoria, Illinois home for the first time without his ‘Sweet Lorraine’ and decided to write a song for her.

After writing the lyrics for ‘Oh Sweet Lorraine,’ he saw an ad in the local paper for a singer-songwriter contest.  Though he was neither of those things, he decided to send in the ballad. ‘I’ll just send a letter,’ he thought. The contest rules asked for a video of the songwriter entrants actually performing their song. ‘Sent it all in. Never thinking I’d get an answer or nothing.’

Green Shoe Studio received just one giant manila envelope in a sea of emailed entries and were a bit taken aback by the size of the large package in their very small mailbox. When they opened it they were taken aback with the heart wrenching package and even though it did not fit the criteria of the contest,
the emotion behind the lyrics was enough convince the studio they wanted the song so one of the owners, Jacob Colgan, took it upon himself to get music created, recorded and produced for Fred. ‘I am a songwriter at heart. This one got to me and I wanted to do it for Fred and Lorraine. ’

Radio, Radio: Is It Dead Yet ?

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Submitted by Michael Williams

In the ever changing small world of Canadian radio, the dust has finally settled for a moment.

We can evaluate the changes.

Investigative journalism is gone with budgets, now is the time of the news cycle and catching up with a story, retractions and excuses. This fueled by citizen paparazzi, cell phones, Facebook and Twitter.

The big three (Bell, Rogers and Telus) are waging war to keep their long held spots, while consumers want relief... Therefore making the enemy of my enemy my friend (Verizon) for now at least.

As a consumer they have not done anything for me lately to respect their position in the market place or my life. I have had outrageous bills, poor service and B.S. from all three. So got not love there when they rip me off. I miss my DSS dish, no one in Canada has given me a comparable service just program stacking and reruns…if I see “School of Rock” one more time I will scream! The big three also play the Canadian card which means as little to Canadian consumers as American made means to Walmart or outsourcing means to Bell.

Speaking of Bell, who got special dispensation from the CRTC to own more than its fair share of radio stations in one marketplace. Bell seems to promise to do more for  the Canadian music industry than it can do for itself by implementing the Quebec Star System in the rest of Canada?

How does that work anyway?

Elizabeth MacInnis: One Eye on the Highway

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Submitted by Don Graham

There must be something the air in Alberta that breeds great country music artists, and Elizabeth MacInnis is about to add her name to the list.  With her debut album MacInnis, a well- travelled and well know background singer and commercial voice, has placed herself directly where she belongs, centre stage and in the spotlight.

'One Eye on the Highway' is an eleven song collection of original tunes, capturing moments in a girl’s life and times. Personal, emotional and revealing but not without its humorous moments.