May 2016


Carleton launches Music Matters

cu-logo-option3.jpg

Submitted to Cashbox Canada

Carleton’s Health Sciences Prof. Renate Ysseldyk and students Noah Latchem, Anita Sengupta and Angela Paric have been studying the health benefits of Music Matters, an innovative music program pairing individuals living with dementia, their caregivers, and local musicians.

Music Matters began with a collaboration involving Ysseldyk, Jesse Stewart, associate professor of music, and Tracy Luciani, president of Artswell. For eight weeks at Elizabeth Bruyère Hospital, several individuals living with dementia and their caregivers from across Ottawa gathered to make music, reminiscence about the past and connect with others.

The program has evolved into much more than anyone had expected. Old friends were reunited, memories were recounted, poetry and songs were composed and impromptu dance solos blossomed. Participants even put on a showcase of their work at the National Arts Centre.

Music-making is increasingly recognized as a cognitively demanding process that is beneficial to brain function, one that could be particularly useful in slowing cognitive decline among healthy older individuals, as well as those with age-related diseases such as dementia. The social element inherent in making music as a group also fosters emotional regulation, social connectedness and improved health.

For more information contact:
Steven Reid
Media Relations Officer
Carleton University
Steven_Reid3@Carleton.ca

Tom Paley

Tom Paley.jpg

Submitted by Iain Patience

When Veteran musician Tom Paley took to the stage at New York's Carnegie Hall in February 2016, he was in reality completing an extraordinary musical circle, a journey that has taken him from his native New York to London via Scandinavia and Sweden but which in a way was significantly symbolized by his return to that New York stage as a leading part of the Lead Belly Festival.

Also on the New York bill in February was Eric Burden, a guy with a firm footing in the music; likewise another elder statesman of the blues, Buddy Guy. Both musicians with a blues pedigree and impressive history to match.

But with Paley, you had the real deal. Now eighty-eight years old, Paley actually played with Lead Belly himself, and was the sole performer who had such a claim to fame, being the last remaining musician alive to have actually played with the legendary, towering twelve-string bluesman,Huddie Ledbetter. Few, if any, could stake a greater claim to take the stage given this remarkable fact.

Guy Clark: Heartbroke

Guy Clark.jpg

Submitted by Don Graham

The music world has lost another giant and a personal favourite of mine, singer/songwriter/luthier Guy Clark. Guy Clark was a songwriter’s songwriter, simple country chords and melodies but lyrics that escaped all labels except for damn fine. Guy Charles Clark a Texas native who migrated to Nashville in 1971 marched to his own drummer .

Probably the best-known of Clark's numerous great works is "Desperados Waiting For a Train," made  popular by Jerry Jeff Walker in the 1970s and The Highwaymen in the 1980s. The song showcased Clark's narrative gifts, telling about an old man's life as seen through the eyes of his young companion.

Clark was born in Monahans, Texas where his grandmother ran a boarding house, and moved to Rockport on the Gulf Coast, where his father had his own law practice.
He worked summers in Rockport at the shipyard and didn’t start playing guitar until he was well into his teens. Clark moved to Houston in the 1960s, working various jobs during the day, including a time as art director for a couple of local T.V. stations..

At night he hit the coffeehouse/folk scene that was populated with folks like Townes Van Zandt and Mickey Newbury.

Clark hadn't made a record but his songs caught the ear of Jerry Jeff Walker, another singer-songwriter who would soon become one of Clark's earliest supporters.

Proudly Canadian: BTO

Bachman Turner Overdrive.png

Bachman–Turner Overdrive is a Canadian rock group from Winnipeg, Manitoba, that had a series of hit albums and singles in the 1970s, selling over 7 million albums in that decade alone. Their 1970s catalogue included five Top 40 albums and six US Top 40 singles (ten in Canada). The band has sold nearly 30 million albums worldwide, and has fans affectionately known as "gearheads" (derived from the band's gear-shaped logo). Many of their songs, including "Let It Ride", "You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet", "Takin' Care of Business", "Hey You" and "Roll On Down the Highway", still receive play on classic-rock stations.

After the band went into a hiatus in 2005, Randy Bachman andFred Turner reunited in 2009 to tour and collaborate on a new album. In 2010, they played the halftime show at the Grey Cup inEdmonton, AB and continue to tour as of summer 2014.

On March 29, 2014, the classic Not Fragile line-up reunited for the first time since 1991 to mark Bachman–Turner Overdrive's induction into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, and participated in performing in a tribute version of "Takin' Care of Business".

The Gloaming 2

The Gloaming 2.jpg

Submitted by Sandy Graham

The second offering of  this five-piece Irish-American supergroup who are truly  have become a phenomenon, packing out concert halls around the world with their blend of traditional influences and subtle experimentation. After the success of the first The Gloaming this now explains the attraction of sellout crowds.

Combining Irish songs, poetry and prose, the fiddles of Martin Hayes and Caoimhin Ó Raghallaigh mix well with the beautiful piano work of New York’s Thomas Bartlett, then add in the powerful vocals of Iarla Ó Lionáird.

The opening track “The Pilgrim’s Song “ is a haunting piano and vocal offering, with beautiful fiddle truly showing off the quality sound of The Gloaming.

“Fáinleog” (The Wanderer) is a faeirie like song, capturing the essence of Ireland and its people.

“The Hare” (In the Corn) has a Southern influenced  to it, with sweet fiddle and gentle piano, with a well produced sound.

“Oisin’s Song” switches over to an acoustic feel, with a folky production while the vocal adds to the magic sound while “The Booley House” takes you back to the traditional slow jigs and reels sound so familiar to us all in North America.

“Repeal the Union” features the talented fiddle offerings of this group of musicians, while the piano stays behind in the background, while enhancing the music.