March 2017

Making Up With Emilia

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Submitted by Lenny Stoute

After the critically acclaimed full length album E in 2014, Toronto-based pop vocalist Emilia had nowhere to go but up. So that's exactly where she's gone with new EP Up. The five song cookie finds Emilia rolling with three heavy hitter Juno winners in producer Ryan Stewart (Hedley, Carly Rae Jepson), songwriter Anjulie and engineer George Seara (Drake, Rhianna, Holly Cole) working out of Toronto's Noble Street Studios, which boasts a client list that includes Shawn Mendes, Drake, The Weeknd and Usher. From this quality team has come a high-sheen, high quality EP that arrived bringing dispatches from the front lines of progressive pop.

A pop project has to be led by singles, and much of the fate of the project hangs on their reception. Up's leadoff single is 'Electricity' adynamic, high energy rollick with one foot in progressive pop and the other on the dance floor, pushed there by a killer chorus, simmering synths onpoint drums and percussion and a vocal both confident and hesitant, a sonic metaphor for young love that's an instant earworm.

"My idea of a good song is one with an honesty of feeling or emotion, an honesty crafted by both the lyrics and the appropriate music. That and a really good hook," offered Emilia.

Danny at the Duke

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Submitted by Sandy Graham

Nestled in the heart of Queen Street in the east end of Toronto sits a really cool club, The Duke. Man about town Danny Marks is also a really cool rock ‘n’ roll icon – so it just made sense for the club operator to put the two together.

On March 25, 2017 The Danny Marks Band will be bringing their music and memories to The Duke, and inviting all to come and rock ‘n’ roll the way they used to do it. A venue like the old days of Larry’s Hideway, Route 66, The Jarvis House, this great old building has old bar chairs, a big dance floor and food service that is both inexpensive and delicious. There is also a beautiful patio for those who might need some fresh air. And one more fact unheard of nowadays – NO COVER CHARGE for this show!

Toronto’s Favourite Listening Spot Hugh’s Room Set to Re-Open

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Submitted by Cashbox Canada & Jane Harbury

Cashbox Canada received an official press release from Jane Harbury, providing us with the update on the ongoing issue of Hugh’s Room and the latest (good) news of one of Toronto’s finest music listening rooms. Here is what was communicated:

Hugh’s Room Update – March 9, 2017

What’s been happening?
A new Not-For Profit corporation has been formed to manage the club. Hugh’s Room For The Performing Arts Inc. is the formal name and the club will now be operating under the trade name of Hugh’s Room Live.

While we were negotiating in good faith with the current landlord, including a hard offer to take over the lease and cover some missing rent, the building was sold and the locks changed. We had been given no hint that a sale was in the works.

As a result, for the last weeks all our attention was focused on reaching out to the new owners and negotiating with them for occupancy. That new lease is being signed on March 9, 2017. The new owner takes possession April 3 and the club needs a minimum of two weeks to get everything back in shape to open the doors and begin our renewed vision. We are projecting that we will finally open in the week of April 19.

Avery Raquel Without A Little Rain CD Release Concert

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

On Tuesday, April 4, Avery Raquel and her band(s) will celebrate the release of Without a Little Rain at 3030 in the Junction. Avery has been working extremely hard over the past year – nothing new for this very focused young woman who started in the entertainment industry when she was just 7 years old – she has risen to every challenge handed to her - probably the biggest to date, has been to write original songs, and to that end there are six Avery Raquel originals on this her sophomore recording.

Her passion for singing has never wavered, and has led to an impressive list of career accomplishments on her musical resume. Avery Raquel has garnered numerous vocal awards over the years, and has excelled on the festival circuit too, delivering winning performances at The Oakville, Brantford, TD Niagara, and South Coast Jazz Festivals and sharing the stage with the likes of Matt Dusk, Lou Pomanti, June Garber, and other prominent Canadian artists.

Adrean Farrugia, Piano, Ross Macintyre, Bass, Joel Haynes & Jackson Haynes, Drums, Greg Kavanagh, Guitar, Brandon Tse, Sax, Kaelin Murphy, Trumpet/Flugelhorn, Amoy & Cecile Levy, Background Vocals, Rob Gusevs, Organ

AVERY RAQUEL
WITHOUT A LITTLE RAIN CD RELEASE CONCERT
IN CONCERT, TUESDAY, APRIL 4 • 6:30PM DOORS/7:30PM MUSIC • $15 ADMISSION or $20 Admission & CD
@ 3030, 3030 DUNDAS STREET WEST, TORONTO

Garage Rock Still Rockin’ It Out – The Sonics

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Submitted by Don Graham


Cover Photo Credit: Bobbi Barbarich

The Sonics formed in 1960 in Tacoma Washington, just 25 miles from Seattle where the grunge movement would start years later. Many of the grunge and punk rock bands would credit The Sonics with influencing their sound and style. Cashbox Canada caught up with Rob Lind, the sax/harp player and founding member to talk about the band and their upcoming tour and specifically their Toronto date ay the Danforth Music Hall.

“It’s interesting to know that we influenced people and that some people credit us with starting the grunge/punk movement. That was never our intention. We were influenced by Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, we just thought of ourselves as a rock ‘n’ roll band. Now granted we were in Tacoma, kinda like the working-class Liverpool to Seattle’s hip and slick London. My dad was a blue collar worker on the waterfront and our lifestyle and our music was more working class grind it out rock ‘n’ roll. Make no mistake, there were some fabulous musicians in Seattle but their style of music was a bit more jazz oriented and sophisticated than ours. Being a sax player I really noticed it. These guys were playing all this complicated jazz stuff and I was a straight rock n roll sax player. We were working class guys who just wanted to rock.”