July 2017

BTW Lucy Rose, Eden Sela, Begonia, Royal Canoe, Washed Out, Eminem, Sean Jones, Kim Doolittle, Joanne Powell

Lucy  Rose Photo Credit Laura Lewis_0.jpg

Submitted by Lenny Stoute
Lucy Rose Photo Credit Laura Lewis

Lucy Rose has let loose her third album Something's Changing via Arts & Crafts. The album is accompanied by a fly-on-the-wall short film documenting her debut tour in Latin America last year, a trip independently organized by Rose with the help of her fans. The tour was the inspiration for the record and the film serves as an intimate account of this process.

In celebration of the new release, the video for the single "No Good At All" is now available. Of the video, Rose says "'No Good At All' is the oldest song on the album and was written just before I went on my first trip to Latin America. When I wrote it, I was kind of feeling that maybe I wasn't good enough for music and was re-thinking everything. But it's also got an element of love to it, finding the one to start a new life with,who one day you could settle down and have a family with. There's a fair amount of self-doubt in this song, but positivity for the future, too."

Country Roads Nashville Meets London

Country Music Festival Nashville Meets London.jpg

Submitted to Cashbox Canada

London is gearing up for the return of the Nashville Meets London Music Festival at Canary Wharf. The festival that brings the sounds of the south will once again fill the air at Canary Wharf’s Canada Square Park, Saturday and Sunday, July 22-23. The two-day event is open to the public and free for all to come and enjoy.
Nashville Meets London is on its way to becoming a firm fixture in London’s music calendar and this July will showcase established and exciting new talent from the heart of country music, Nashville, Tennessee and the UK.

This year’s talent lineup will feature US-based acts Russell Dickerson, Lucie Silvas, Ashley Campbell, Sam Outlaw, Angaleena Presley, and Jo Smith, alongside UK-based acts Flats & Sharps, Wildwood Kin, Kevin McGuire, and Raintown.

Country music lovers can make the most of Canary Wharf’s wide variety of bars and restaurants nearby, including numerous American dining options such as American-inspired and London favorites The Big Easy, Shake Shack and The Breakfast Club.

Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams Contraband Love

Larry Campbell and Theresa Williams.jpg

Submitted by Iain Patience

Modern musical partnerships are no new things. Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash; Duane and Gregg Allman; Doc and Merle Watson; Simon and Garfunkel; Kris Kristofferson and Rita Coolidge – you get the picture, no doubt. With Nashville treasures and general US recording remarkables, Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams you again have the real deal, a pair of seemingly intuitive musicians, singer-songwriters and all round stellar performers who seem to have arrived on the scene already fully formed.

Grabbing the chance to speak with both Campbell and Williams at home in world-festival-famous Woodstock in upstate New York on the brink of the release of their latest album, ‘Contraband Love,’ on Red House Records, it becomes readily apparent that this pair do almost everything together, including interviews. Both are in relaxed mode though about to hit the road playing with Emmylou Harris before kicking off with two New York nights, on a gruelling US-wide tour that they both agree will be tiring at times.

Campbell confirms he used to enjoy the touring, has been all over – much of it with Bob Dylan’s band – and can still enjoy hitting new towns, people and places along the way: ‘Though I dig being at home, sometimes it’s still cool to see new places, people; and that’s a benefit,’ he sighs.

Lowest of the Low Release New Single Powerlines

Powerlines.jpg

Submitted to Cashbox Canada

One of Canada's most lauded independent bands, Lowest of the Low, announced earlier this year a string of live dates this summer including an appearance at Hillside Festival this Friday and a headlining show at The Danforth Music Hall on September 9th. Now the band are excited to announce that their fourth studio album Do The Right Now is set for release on September 8th via Pheromone Recordings.

On the single, front man Ron Hawkins reflects, "Powerlines is a song about my experiences writing the first Low album, Shakespeare My Butt. I had recently broken up with a long time partner and moved into a punk rock squat with some crazy characters I called friends. Every day I walked through the city with a notebook and drank in bars and went to galleries and shows and hung out in my little bohemian circle of anarchists, punks and poets. I became the protagonist in the movie of my life and the city was a cinematic sidekick and factored into the lyrics like a companion."

The visually stunning lyric video was made in collaboration with photographer, Tom Ryaboi, a pioneer of the art of roof topping. The video reflects Ron's relationship with his hometown of Toronto and his changing perspective of it over the years. The video is a natural fit to depict a very modern version of Toronto from perspectives not often seen.

Ruthie Foster @ Hugh’s Room Live

Ruthie Foster Photo Credit Mary Keating-Bruton.jpg

Submitted to Cashbox Canada

In the tightknit musical community of Austin, Texas, it’s tough to get away with posturing. You either bring it, or you don’t.

If you do, word gets around. And one day, you find yourself dueting with Bonnie Raitt or standing onstage with the Allman Brothers at New York’s Beacon Theater and trading verses with Susan Tedeschi. You might even wind up getting nominated for a Best Blues Album Grammy — three times in a row. And those nominations would be in addition to your seven Blues Music Awards, three Austin Music Awards, the Grand Prix du Disque award from the Académie Charles-Cros in France, and a Living Blues Critics’ Award for Female Blues Artist of the Year.

There’s only one Austinite with that résumé: Ruthie Foster.

The small rural town of Gause, Texas had no chance of keeping the vocal powerhouse known as Ruthie Foster to itself. The worship services at her community church and influences like Mavis Staples and Aretha Franklin created the foundation of her vocal capabilities, which developed into her own sound which is unable to be contained within a single genre. That uniqueness echoes a common theme in Ruthie’s life and career - marching to the beat of her own drum.

Joining the Navy was one way for Ruthie to stake out her own path. It was during her time singing for the Navy band Pride that her love for performing became apparent. After leaving the service, Ruthie signed a development deal with Atlantic Records and moved to New York City to pursue a career as a professional musician.