September 2017

Julian Taylor Hits the Road Again

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

After a highly successful summer tour that highlighted shows with Marianas Trench, a showcase at Carleton University and the brand new Sawdust City Music Festival in Gravenhurst, the Julian Taylor Band’s on the road again. Ontario dates include some of the band’s favourite spots at Owen Sound, Newmarket, Hamilton, London, Ottawa and Corbyville.

Self-described as “pilgrims of funk, soul ‘n’ roll,” the Julian Taylor Band makes music as eclectic and all-encompassing as their taste will allow. They move effortlessly between vintage soul, tasty funk, tender balladry, indie rock, and even the occasional foray into social comment, solo acoustic, reggae and psychedelia – all done expertly. Leading the band, Taylor boasts a drop-dead killer voice, impressive guitar work, and a knack for writing catchy, earworm choruses – all of which pegs him as an authentic, eclectic talent for anyone’s palate.

UPCOMING TOUR DATES:

Sept 23 – Heartwood Concert Hall - Owen Sound, ON - $15
Oct 13 – Market Brewing Co. – Newmarket, ON - $35
Oct 14 – Mills Hardware – Hamilton, ON - $12 Adv. / $15 Door
Oct 19 – The Aeolian Hall ticket - London, ON - $20 Adv. / $25 Door
Oct 26 – National Arts Centre - Studio Hall - Ottawa, ON - $23
Oct 28 – Signal Brewery Hallowe'en Bash - Corbyville, ON

For more info please visit www.juliantaylorband.com

MEDIA CONTACT:
Beverly Kreller, Publicist | SPEAK Music
bev@speak-music.com |

Canadian Country Music Association Awards 2017

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Submitted by Don Graham

Every year in September the pilgrimage to celebrate Canadian country music, its artists, songwriters, business folks, radio stations and fans kicks into full gear. This year the gathering was in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and for four days and nights the city rocked with Wranglers, Tony Lamas and pearl snap shirts. The days leading up to the Awards show are filled with old friends gathering together, road musicians reacquainting with compadres; they crisscross on the road with fans, radio folks and country music lovers. Late night hotel lobby jams are common place.

The 2017 Canadian Country Music Association Awards Show had Saskatoonians on their feet at SaskTel Centre in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and Canadians from coast-to-coast cheering for all their favourite country stars on CBC when the awards were broadcast exclusively by the national public broadcaster at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT). In the action-packed two-hour event, eight of the most sought-after CCMA Awards were presented and fourteen exceptional performances blew fans away.

Steve Lamb of Old Man Flanagan’s Ghost Given Beach Celt of the Year Honours

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada
Photo at right: Old Man Flanagan's Ghost

Organizer and Producer of the Beach Celtic Festival Sandy Graham (also Cashbox Canada’s Editor in Chief) has announced the musician and founder of Old Man Flanagan’s Ghost will be the Beach Celt of the Year for 2017. “Steve Lamb is the perfect choice for the Beach Celt of the Year 2017. His efforts to continue to promote Celtic heritage is tireless and his support of the Beach Celtic Festival year after year is well appreciated.”

With heritage tracing back to Enneskillen, Ireland, and with a father who created a cassette tape of Irish music and played with a group called the Molloy Show Band,  there is no cookie-cutter description that can be given to this songwriter's contributions.  With influences from several musical genres and  decades, and a passion for writing, he creates clear imagery and elicits emotion through vivid and imaginative storytelling within his original songs.  Taught guitar by his father, he has been singing in front of crowds for decades.  His voice has been described as deep, warm and powerful.

Shawna Caspi Releases 4th Studio Album Forest Fire

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

Toronto-based singer-songwriter Shawna Caspi released her fourth studio album Forest Fire on September 1st, 2017. Engineered and produced by Don Kerr (Rheostatics, Bahamas, Ron Sexsmith), the album is complete with Shawna’s remarkable lyrical fingerpicking guitar style, elegant arrangements and powerful messaging in which Shawna strives to be unafraid, to embolden quieted voices and to tell the truth above all else.

Forest Fire is a collection of songs about burning things down and building them up again, drawing listeners into the depths of haunting, atmospheric tracks, then lifting them out with airy, bluegrass instrumentation and hopeful narratives for brighter days. It’s dark granite stone with a shot of glimmering quartz through the middle. When the words get heavy, they are held up to the light of love, grace, and gratitude. The album features a compelling mix of instrumentalists including Rosalyn Dennett (fiddle, background vocals), Don Kerr (drums, background vocals, cello), Dave Matheson (piano, organ), Joel Schwartz (electric guitar, baritone guitar, rhythm acoustic guitar, mandolin, resonator, tenor banjo), Ben Whiteley (double bass) and Alyssa Wright (cello).

Bruce Cockburn Announces New Album Bone On Bone

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

Bruce Cockburn has announced the September 15, 2017 release of his first full-length album in seven years, Bone On Bone (True North Records). The release coincides with his induction into the Canadian Songwriter’s Hall Of Fame, and the launch of his longest touring schedule in decades.

Few recording artists are as creative and prolific as Bruce Cockburn. Since his self-titled debut in 1970, the Canadian singer-songwriter has issued a steady stream of acclaimed albums every couple of years. But that output suddenly ran dry in 2011 following the release of Small Source of Comfort. There were good reasons for the drought. For one thing, Cockburn became a father again with the birth of his daughter Iona. Then there was the publication of his 2014 memoir Rumours of Glory.

“I didn’t write any songs until after the book was published because all my creative energy had gone into three years of writing it,” Cockburn explains, from his home in San Francisco. “There was simply nothing left to write songs with. As soon as the book was put to bed, I started asking myself whether I was ever going to be a songwriter again.”