March 2018

Van William’s Releases 1ST Album Countries

Van William Photo Credit Silvia Grav.jpg

Submitted to Cashbox Canada
Van William Photo Credit Silvia Grav

Acclaimed rock singer-songwriter, Van William, is joining another sparkling artist on the rise, Lissie, for a national tour kicking off at The Teragram Ballroom in Los Angeles on May 2nd. The 13-date tour will hit major markets across the US and Canada – full routing is below. Van is currently on the road in Europe with Swedish duo First Aid Kit, in support of his acclaimed debut album, Countries, out now via Fantasy Records.

Countries has been met with excitement both here and overseas. The Los Angeles Times called it, “A brash, confident folk-rock statement that affirms William's place in contemporary L.A. songcraft.” And UPROXX praised Countries as, “One of 2018’s first great folk-rock records.”

Inspired by his love for David Lynch’s cult classic film, Wild at Heart, Van just released a captivating video clip, directed by Silvia Grav and featuring Caitlin Gerard (American Crime) for the new single, Before I Found You. Before I Found You is the follow-up to the album’s first single, the Top 5 Triple A track, Revolution featuring First Aid Kit.

Eric Andersen Silent Angel: Fire and Ashes of Heinrich Böll

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Submitted by Don Graham

Years from now when the generation studies music history, the folk music revival of the 1960’s to be specific, Eric Andersen will be a large part of that study. But for now, Eric is going back in history for his projects for Meyer Records. His output on the Meyer label has included a tribute to the existential Camus and the rock star Lord Byron mingling with the Universe. And now his focus is Heinrich Böll; a Nobel Prize-winning writer, an anti-fascist, and soldier in the German army who deserted the army and eventually was captured by Americans where he was sent to a Prisoner of War camp.

Silent Angel: Fire and Ashes shines a light on the life and adventures of Heinrich Böll; who dedicated his life to chronicling his experiences of wartime and post-war Germany. And from these writings, Eric was able to knit together songs that tell those tales but also manage to warn of the ever-present danger of history repeating itself with the current political landscape.

The album starts with a light-hearted song Wenn de Wasser Im Rhein Gold’ner Wein War, If The Water of The Rhine Was Golden Wine but that is where the levity ends. Eric kicks in with a sobering collection of songs that came to him from studying the man.

Arizona Blues Hall of Fame guitarist Jim Glass dies at 70

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Story Credit Ed Masley The Republic azcentral.com
Jim Glass Photo Credit Candace Porth

Joshua Glass says he always loved watching his father, Arizona Blues Hall of Famer Jim Glass, play guitar.“I can honestly say those are the times that I could see the pure joy on his face,” he says. “When he was playing.”

Jim Glass died Feb. 26 after suffering a massive heart attack. He was 70.

“He had a heart attack a couple years ago,” his son recalls. “And that pretty much did a number on him. He never quite fully recovered. There were some issues in his lungs, and then he had another massive heart attack on his way to a doctor’s appointment and it was just too much.”

Michele Robins, a jazz announcer at KJZZ, met Glass in 1984.

"When I first heard Jim play,” she says, “I thought he sounded like a cross between Eric Clapton and the Allman Brothers, such a pure, sweet tone. He always told me that the sign of a great blues guitarist was less notes, not more. His passion was playing the blues and I'm so happy he was able to share this love with Arizona for such a long time. He truly was the best blues guitarist to have ever graced the Arizona music scene."

Beyond his chops, Glass brought a certain presence to the scene that did not go unnoticed.

"I'll never forget his charm," Robins says, "those beautiful blue eyes, how much he loved cats (he had eight cats at one time living with him!) and that incredible sound coming from his vintage Les Paul."

Red Black Red Resettlement

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Submitted by Scott Wigley

There’s a lot of fire and fury released over the course of Red Black Red’s debut, Resettlement, but the album’s eight songs are full of intelligence and thoughtfulness as well. The clear strands of alternative rock and electronica coloring the release is masterfully orchestrated from song to song and Enrico Fernando’s songwriting and performances alike can rarely be accused of repeating itself. He gives the audience a different look, virtually every time out on Resettlement without ever stretching too far and overextending listener’s credibility. The lyrical work going into this album is a, perhaps, surprisingly successful component in Resettlement’s mix and the songwriting is often inspired by the immigrant experience in the United States and the challenges many of those individuals and families face in modern America. The treatment, however, is never too ponderous and the production frames Fernando’s message in the polished, professional light.

Ry Cooder The Prodigal Son Returns

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

The Prodigal Son, Ry Cooder’s first new solo release in six years, is set for release by Fantasy Records on May 11th, 2018.

Recorded in Hollywood, CA, and produced by Ry and his chief collaborator, drummer Joachim Cooder, The Prodigal Son is all America - our spiritual, hopeful voices, our raw cries and our sly provocations, voiced through the songs of the Pilgrim Travelers, The Stanley Brothers, Blind Willie Johnson, and Ry Cooder himself.

The album’s 11 tracks, including three Cooder originals and a carefully selected collection of his favorite spirituals of the last century, share a particular resonance in this time and place, forming an unflinching look at the state of play in modern America.

“I do connect the political/economic dimensions with the inner life of people since people are at risk and oppressed on all sides in our world today,” he stated. “There’s some kind of reverence mood that takes hold when you play and sing these songs. ‘Reverence’ is a word I heard my granddaughter’s nursery school teacher use, a Kashmiri woman. She said, ‘We don’t want to teach religion, but instill reverence.’ I thought that was a good word for the feeling of this music.”