April 2018

Audiotree North Launch Video Project at the Horseshoe Tavern on May 11 2018

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

As part of Audiotree North's launch, the team filmed live music videos with six artists in Toronto; including PUP, Lido Pimienta, Casper Skulls, Pony, Magic Giant, and Begonia. Today, they share the live performance video for Begonia's track, Out Of My Head.

"I wrote Out Of My Head at a pretty desperate time in my life," says Begonia, of the song. "I had just found the courage to separate from a very toxic relationship but wasn't fully prepared for how hard the fall out would be. I felt haunted by all the memories and had trouble seeing things clearly. When I wrote the lyrics, I kind of pictured myself yelling at...myself. I was begging myself to move on and rise above the darkness that I felt was following me, while also trying to take stock of how far I had come by simply leaving that relationship behind in the first place. I knew I just had to keep moving forward even if it didn't feel easy. The main message is basically just to trust your instincts and that sometimes even in your darkest moments you have more power than you think. Power from family, from a community, but most importantly power from inside yourself."

Pete Townshend Who Came First

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Submitted to Cashbox Canada

Who Came First’ is the debut solo record by Pete Townshend, first released in 1972. The album collected together tracks from Townshend's private pressings of his tributes to Meher Baba, Happy Birthday and I Am, as well as demos from the unrealized concept album Lifehouse, part of which became The Who's classic Who's Next album.

To celebrate the 45th Anniversary, the album will be released as a 2 CD-expanded version, featuring eight previously unreleased tracks, new edits, alternative versions and live performances. Also included in the eight-panel digipak are new sleeve notes provided by Townshend himself, the original poster from the 1972 release and a 24-page booklet which contains rare images of Meher Baba and Townshend in his recording studio. The cover photo of Townshend, taken by Graham Hughes (who also shot the cover of The Who's Quadrophenia), has been updated for this release.

Sour Bruthers EP

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Submitted by Jason Hillenburg

The Chicago based group debuts with a self-titled EP effort illustrating a remarkable understanding of traditional music and the needed imagination to transform it. Their transformation gives this EP release a distinctively individual quality unlike what we hear from many Americana themed acts today. It’s a tricky balance to maintain fidelity to a particular form while still bringing something of yourself to it that doesn’t move it too far from its roots. Sour Bruthers realizes that ambition straight out of the gate with this self-titled studio release and polishes off the collection with robust production capturing the spirit of these songs and rendering the band’s approach with clarity and balance. Sour Bruthers enter a crowded field, this style of music proving increasingly popular once again and sustaining a niche musical community within popular culture, but they obviously possess the talent to stand out from the pack and claim a spot as theirs alone.

BTW Nature Boy, Little Miss Higgins, Rufus John, Paul Cherry, Ellevator, Lowell, Float Your Fanny Down The Ganny

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Submitted by Lenny Stoute

All over the map or fiercely inclusive? That's Opia, the recently released, inaugural musical statement from Nature Boy a.k.a. Toronto-based singer/songwriter Vincent Bertucci.

Opia is the album Bertucci has been striving towards his entire life. And he’s got the extraordinary backstory to prove it. Featuring 10 dazzling original songs – all written or co-written by Bertucci on guitar and piano alongside a marquee group of long-time collaborators — Opia explores life, death, and love (and raising the odd glass) via jazz-informed pop and soft-rock.

Consider Opia’s head-spinning instrumental roster which includes glockenspiel, Hammond B-3 and Rhodes organ, various synths, drums, percussion, guitars and… wait for it… manmade “whale sounds” and Tibetan singing bowls, correctly listed in the liner notes as being “wicked.” Opia’s songs soar… even the candlelit ones. Check the iridescent, keyboard-guided slow burn of “10 Past 9.” The album’s fearlessly knock-kneed first single juxtaposes an urgent message of desire against a languid vocal delivery. The track gets extra oomph from a kooky (also bitingly sad/funny) accompanying video chronicling the exploits of a furry blue mascot trying to snag his costumed crush’s attention.

Caroline Ferrante - Sky

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Submitted by Pamela Bellmore

The four song EP Sky, Caroline Ferrante’s second studio release and third overall, solidifies her growing stature as one of the indie folk scene’s brightest songwriting talents. The first single from the release “ Feel Like a Holiday” has already enjoyed considerable success, including garnering a coveted award for one of 2017’s best singles from Ark of Music, and Ferrante continues to push this richly rewarding release. It deserves a wide hearing. Ferrante’s songs are uniformly exceptional and further enhanced by her forceful singing that explores a wide range of emotions with a clear ear turned towards balanced interpretation. Unlike many purveyors of this style who merely look to hit specific marks, Ferrante is a writer and performer who imbue her vision of traditional music with clear charisma and individuality that makes these recordings her own, beholden to no obvious influences. Sky will generate a lot of momentum for this artist and we can only wonder what direction she’ll turn next.