Music

Tom Lodge and Radio Caroline

By Kathy Hahn "In the softness of now there's a vast presence. A place where sound caresses and colors, forms touch. To sink into this presence is to expand into the truth. The invitation is to melt into this Now.”   Umi Cashbox Magazine (U.S. and Canada) sits down with Radio Caroline icon and legendary broadcaster, Tom Lodge to talk about the past, present and future of music and radio broadcasting. Tom’s pursuit for freedom eventually led him to the Zen path of Enlightenment. He is now known by the name, Umi (meaning the sea) and lives at his own Stillpoint Zen Community Ashram in Santa Cruz, California. Tom has a new expanded book containing more stories about radio and music people, coming out in November, “The Ship That Rocked The World”, “How Radio Caroline Defied the Establishment, Launched the British Invasion and Made the Planet Safe for Rock and Roll.” For all of you who are not aware of Tom and his story, here is how he made history on the offshore pirate radio ship, rocking the world and forever changing the shape of pop culture as we know it today. Born in Surrey, England and growing up in the war years in Virginia, USA, Tom moved to Canada on his 18th birthday and became a cowboy in Alberta. He almost lost his life while ice fishing on Great Slave Lake, the subject of his first book, "Beyond the Great Slave Lake". Tom recalls  his early life was one big adventure. Growing up listening to radio while in the United States - including a lot of free form radio - helped shape his vision of what radio could  be, when he returned to England.

Canadian Musicians Busk For War Child

War Child

Liam Titcolm, Chantal Kreviazuk, Default and others take to the streets

By Karen Bliss

Musician Liam Titcomb raised a staggering $50,000 for War Child Canada on his recent 50-city, 99-show national busking tour, which ended Sept. 26,  and three days later more than 40 artists took to the Toronto streets for the same cause, Busking For Change.

War Child Canada CEO War Child Lisa Zbitnew called Titcomb’s accomplishment  “a remarkable journey by an extraordinary young man,” adding, “$50,000 is a tremendous achievement and a huge boost for the charity.”

War Child is an award-winning charity that provides opportunities and long-term solutions for war-affected children, focusing on education, strengthening children's rights, reducing poverty and fostering self reliance.

Forecast: "Snow" Storms - EXCLUSIVE - Darrin Kenneth O’Brien launches DKO Productions

Snow

By Bill Delingat

Born October 30th 1969, raised in a Toronto city projects of North York in an area known as Allenbury Gardens, Darrin Kenneth O’Brien and his gang of friends soon gained a reputation as gentlemen hoods and lived a life of crime to survive. Darrin lived in the projects with his single mum, sister and brother. His mother, Donna, loved R&B music and Darrin and his brother would often sing along to his mother’s collection on the back deck. Darrin became known as Snow to his Jamaican neighbours and a star was born. No one would have known that years later in 1993, this backyard ‘hood would become one of the world’s biggest reggae star with his debut album 12” of ‘Snow’, with more than eight million records sold of the charttopping hit “Informer”.

Digging Roots

Digging Roots

By Lenny Stoute

Digging Roots is a Kama Sutra kind of band, one that can assume some very unique positions. There’s that genre defying sound in a class by itself, they’re a rock world rarity with dual frontpersons and while they can bang a gong for the sheer rawk’n’roll of it with the best of ‘em, they’re also capable of issue-inspired lyrics sharp as a steppin’ razor. Duality is in the marrow of this band as reflecting its nature as a collaboration between Shoshona Kish and Raven Kanatakta to cut holes in the far fences of roots music.

Reached at the couple’s woodsy central Ontario home on a mellow fall afternoon, Shoshona is pleased to talk about the collaborative process of creating Digging Roots music.

Without a Net: The Imani Winds in Concert

Imani 1

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor

When you walk onstage to perform with a chamber ensemble, you're flying without a net.  A musical net is any structure that provides the glue that holds everything together.   In an orchestra or a jazz band, for example, rhythm is pumped along by a percussion section and the underlying harmony is represented in the orchestration or, at the very least, the piano.  But when the Imani Winds took the stage at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin, they didn't need drums or pianos or anything else. They created a dazzling landscape of color, and it came from the inside out.

The classical  woodwind quintet is comprised of flute, oboe, clarinet, french horn, and bassoon.  And what holds it together is an implicit, internalized pulse that passes through the members of the group like an invisible ball of energy they toss around in a circle. Hot potato. And it never gets dropped.

Watching Paint Dry: Banging Through the Stigma of Classical Music

Tomaro

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

"You want me to do what? Do you realize the Canucks are in the playoffs tonight? But, instead, you want me to put on a tie and go see your cousin's kid play the violin? Are you nuts?"

This vituperous outburst, or something quite like it, occurs regularly around exasperated moms, wives, nieces and the like as they try to drag recalcitrant hubbies, brothers and significant others to symphony concert halls all across North America. Most guys would rather be yanked down into the caves by Morlocks than sit through Brahms.

The question of how and why this seemingly impenetrable wall went up around the classical music performance experience in our culture has long frustrated pundits and duffers, alike.  

Touching Bass With Alain Caron

Alain Caron

By Tristan Stagg, Halifax NS

Canadian world renowned bassist Alain Caron, is best known for his work with the 1980's jazz fusion group UZEB. In his career, Alain has teamed up and toured internationally with the Mike Stern Trio, the Leni Stern Band, as well as the CARON-ECAY-LOCKWOOD trio. Since then, Alain has released numerous solo albums such as "Rhythm and Jazz", "Call me Al”, "Play", and most recently in 2006, "Conversations". After two tours of Europe and playing at several major jazz festivals in Canada earlier this year, Caron is back on his game with the release of a new solo album early this fall.

Cashbox had the opportunity to speak with Alain about his past and what is next to come.

TS: Who were your influences growing up?

TransmitTALKS, TransmitLIVE, TransmitNOW

International music industry think-tank in BC
By Karen Bliss

Transmission 2009 is set to take place in Victoria, British Columbia, Sept. 22 to 26, bringing together industry heavyweights to debate and determine solutions facing the music business and opine about its future.

This year’s transmitTALKs, as the conference portion is called, presented by RIM, will be located in Crystal Gardens.  There will be more than 60 roundtable discussions focusing on emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, India and China; the present and future role of copyright in music; and the required skills and qualifications of “next generation leaders.”

Featured speakers include music producer and media professor Sandy Pearlman; online book pioneer Hannes Brun, president and CEO of Abe Books; and David Hyman, Internet innovator and founder/CEO of music content site MOG.

Changing the Model of Symphony Orchestra Management

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

Fallout from the downturn has orchestra managers reeling.   Even before the economy went south, the traditional management model was creaking with age and leaking at the seams.  Something had to be done, and it took a perfect storm to put change into motion.

The elements of this storm collided at the outset of 2008: the graying of the audience, diminishing sponsorship, decreasing audience numbers, and increasing competition for consumer entertainment dollars.  Then, in a coup de gras, the stock market tumbled and orchestra endowments from Maine to Oregon  doubled over and yelled for mama.  We're just beginning to dig ourselves out from under the rubble.

But good things have come out of it. Smart Boards realized they had an opportunity to tighten up an outmoded management model and bring it into this century.

Johnnie Lovesin: 50 years of Rock ‘n’ Roll

By Bill Delingat

Johnnie Lovesin, the Veteran rocker from Val D'Or, Quebec, got his start in the mid-1960's when he moved to Toronto to what would become the hub of the flower power scene in Toronto‘s Yorkville. Johnnie spent much of his time pan- handling, busking for change and playing with whoever would listen and most bands did.

By the mid 70’s Johnnie was known as  'Crazy John' Lovesin and he was planning to form a band called “Black Ballet”.With his charisma and  smile, he gained the attention of the promoters of  some of the biggest rock festivals around,  becoming a popular figure backstage at arena events. Several bands later ,Johnnie went on to call himself the “Ace from Space” and formed his now legendary show,” Johnnie Lovesin And The Invisible Band” and caught the attention of  cutting edge promoters “The Garys”.

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