Features

The Jargon

KBP

Keith Bradford is Executive Director of Cashbox Magazine, Nashville Tennessee. Mr. Bradford is also the director of NBRN.FM, owner of KMA Records, and also runs Keith Bradford Promotions.
Bradford is in the pre-production of the release of his new DVD Series, The Music Business – Ya Gotta Luv It!
Cashbox Canada is pleased to present weekly excerpts from this series to be released in 2011.

The Jargon:
Let’s start with what the dictionary says jargon means: A characteristic language of an occupational group. Or Specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject.

Do you think you could graduate from Medical school without knowing the names of the muscles in the human body? What makes you think you will be on an even plain with the music industry moguls if you haven’t a clue what they are talking about?

One of my favorite sayings is “WHO’S HANDLING HER?” This refers to wanting to know who a certain female artist’s manager or booking agent is. The word handling as we know it may or may not apply depending on whether the artist relationship with who’s handling her is platonic or otherwise.
 
A close second I find is the reference to, “I cut Susie Jones last night.” This refers to recording a singer. But a CUT also means a songwriter just got one of his songs recorded and hopefully released on an album . But then again you could be CUT from the artist roster by your label which means you got the ax.

The Boston Pops with Keith Lockhart …The Legacy Lives On.

The Boston Pops-Photo Credit Stu Rosner

The Boston Pops, these three words are instantly recognizable words of vintage Americana. And rightfully so! They are celebrating their 125th anniversary this year, 2010.
The Boston Symphony Orchestra was formed in 1881 and founder Henry Lee Higginson wrote at the time of his desire to present to the city of Boston, concerts of a lighter type of music. From 1885 to 1900 a series of concerts, known as “The Promenade Concerts” were performed, combining “lighter’ classical music with the popular theatre tunes of the day. Except for the obvious updating to current songs, not much has changed with the structure of The Boston Pops.

It wasn’t until 1930 that The Boston Pops appointed its first official conductor, Arthur Fiedler. And so would begin incredible 50 year tenure as the ‘Pops’ conductor! With Fiedler at the helm The Boston Pops popularity spread far beyond the city of Boston with the aid of radio, television and recordings. Fiedler was determined to show people that classical music wasn’t just for the well heeled and made good on his efforts to get the music to the everyday man and woman. Under Fiedler’s direction The Boston Pops has sold more recordings than any other orchestra in the world, with sales exceeding $50 million. The first recording was in 1935 for RCA Victor Records and included the first complete recording of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. In 1947, they recorded their first hi-fidelity recording, featuring the music of Jacques Offenbach.

Bert Gould and Joe Owens Swing For The Fences With New Concert Company

Cover Aug 20, 2010

by Sandy Graham

Cashbox Canada is read by many Canadian music industry icons who would remember the name Joe Owens for many things; Dunn & Owens, CPI, Quality Records, Triumph (the band actually thanked Owens for their success on a televised Juno Award Show) amongst many positions he held in the Canadian market as well as author of ‘Welcome to The Jungle’ – the music industry bible for many years.

Joe Owens is actually a U.S. citizen, who ended up in Canada in the 1960’s when his Mum moved the family to Ontario. Owens went to school here, attending York, and continued on in the business vein, joining the music industry in the 1970’s when Canada was at its peak for live entertainment and label activity.

‘I was lucky to enjoy the industry at a time when it was booming. I had an American attitude but understood the Canadian way of thinking’, Owens told Cashbox. Owens was well respected in the industry, and was considered a trailblazer in his trade. After more than a decade here, he returned to the U.S. (some still feel a great loss to the Canadian industry) where he was a major player in producing The Billboard Music Awards. He went on to excel in sponsorship and marketing liaisons with video games (Sega/PlayStation), which led him to a position of working with promotion agencies to gain his experience with corporate sponsorship – which resulted in record stats tallying up to $ 400 million in sponsorship and promotions.

Kenny Loggins …… Still Lovin’ His Music !

Kenny Loggins 1

By Don Graham

Very seldom does a duo split and one of the two parts go on to larger success than they had. Even Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel as individuals didn’t reach the level of prominence of Simon and Garfunkel. Although each achieved some level of success the best known songs are still S&G songs, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Mrs. Robinson and Sounds of Silence. Don Everly sans Phil was not a household name. And the list goes on.

Kenny Loggins is the exception to that rule! As half of the hugely successful pop duo Loggins and Messina with Jim Messina of Buffalo Springfield and Poco fame, they had phenomenal hits with ‘Your Mama Don’t Dance’, ‘Danny’s Song’ and ‘House at Pooh Corner’ to name few. Formed in 1972 this group was a mainstay on the pop charts until 1976 when they disbanded to pursue solo careers.

Soul Music’s Silver Lining Bounces Back With New Album

Liberty Silver

By Lenny Stoute

Lock up the boys. Liberty Silver’s back and hot times are on the horizon. After stepping out of the spotlight to deal with a family tragedy stemming from a fatal house fire, the major mama from Mississauga is set to drop her first album in five years, Groove Symphony, later this month.

It’s an extremely significant one for Liberty, not only as a career benchmark but also as musical memorial to her father, gravely ill at the time of interview, who was a bone deep inspiration to the lady. “Essentially I had to step up and take responsibility for raising two of my granddaughters. I felt family was more important than career and I acted on that.

“ To be honest I thought it would be easier, but now I just use more beauty aid. Everything coming into the house is strictly monitored and we do a lot of family things together. I knew that the music could always wait. I’m always family first, because I know when you do work hard, you do get rewarded. And I don’t buy into a lot of fame and bling things. I’ve seen a lot of that, enough to know what the value of that is. Especially compared to the value of other things.”

“Once the kids were on the right track, I was ready to get back to making music. There was such a backlog of emotions and ideas, once I sat down I had all the writing done in a month. I was born to make music and so I knew when the time was right it would all come pouring out.”

The Boy Who Would Be King

Cover Aug 13, 2010

by Don Graham

On January 8th, 1935, in Tupelo, Mississippi, was born to Gladys and Vernon Presley, a baby boy. He would be named Elvis Aaron Presley, and one day would be known simply as…..The King !

From his humble beginnings in that tiny two room house in Tupelo, Elvis lived what seemed to be a normal life with his poor but hard working parents. An only child, his twin Jesse Garon died in childbirth, Elvis was given whatever his parents could afford to give, but most of all he was given an abundance of love by his doting mother. It is widely thought that because of the passing of his twin, Gladys was determined that young Elvis would be protected and well looked after.

When Elvis was thirteen, in 1948, the Presleys moved to Memphis, Tennessee where Elvis would begin to form his musical style. He was influenced by the country and pop music of the day as well the church music that he heard and the music at the all night Gospel services he would sometimes attend. Combine these influences with the black R & B that he heard on Beale Street and you get an idea of where this mixture of sounds and feels would take this young singer.

The Demo

NBRN

Keith Bradford is Executive Director of Cashbox Magazine, Nashville Tennessee. Mr. Bradford is also the director of NBRN.FM, owner of KMA Records, and also runs Keith Bradford Promotions.
Bradford is in the pre-production of the release of his new DVD Series, The Music Business – Ya Gotta Luv It!
Cashbox Canada is pleased to present weekly excerpts from this series to be released in 2011.

The Demo
by Keith Bradford

The word demo is an abbreviation for demonstration recording. It came about after the final realization that many fine songwriters did not know how to read or write sheet music. They could however strum a guitar and sing you the song or accompany themselves on the piano or some other musical instrument.

No longer did a publisher have to give an artist a piece of sheet music to show them how a song sounded. With the demo the artist can hear instantly how the melody goes and learn how to sing the song without being able to read a single note.

The difference between a demo and a master is sometimes very vague. The demonstration recording is supposed to be just an idea of how the song goes. The master on the other hand is the finished arrangement and production of the song. Sometimes demos come out so well they end up being released as the master.

The Music Business, YA GOTTA LUV IT

RB Renegade - Second Time Around

RB Renegade

When you first start talking to RB Renegade, you immediately get caught up in his infectious enthusiasm for everything. His music, the country legends stars he interviews for his NBRN internet radio show, his writing, his family, his soul mate and wife, Shari.

Born in Toronto, Canada, RB was recruited to move to the U.S. for work not related to the music industry. He stayed on and now Boston, MA is his home, where he resides when not travelling back and forth to Music City, USA.

When asked how he first was influenced to be a singer/songwriter his answer was surprising. ‘I played trombone in the High School band. But we had an English teacher, you know they typical British school marm type, who really opened my eyes to my writing. Her name was Mrs. Robinson and one day she brought an album in for us to listen to during class. It was Simon and Garfunkel, ‘Sounds of Silence’. That was it for me. I was hooked. I went home and wrote my very first song that night; ‘In My Room’, hugely influenced by ‘I Am A Rock’. I spent many hours with Mrs. Robinson after that, who encouraged me to write poetry, which of course is really what the basis of all good songs are anyway. Later on I was influenced by great writers like Gordon Lightfoot, I loved rock n roll like all kids my age, The Beach Boys, Beatles, then later on I liked great Canadian artists like Bryan Adams and Blue Rodeo.’One person whose music was always an influence was that of Terry Sumsion and to be on the same label with him now and to be working with him is such an honor.

The NEW Record Club

KBP

Keith Bradford is Executive Director of Cashbox Magazine, Nashville Tennessee. Mr. Bradford is also the director of NBRN.FM, owner of KMA Records, and also runs Keith Bradford Promotions.
Bradford is in the pre-production of the release of his new DVD Series, The Music Business – Ya Gotta Luv It!
Cashbox Canada is pleased to present weekly excerpts from this series to be released in 2011.

By Keith Bradford

Dwight Yoakam-What’s Gold Is New Again

Cover Aug 6, 2010

By Lenny Stoute

Country music’s renaissance cowboy Dwight Yoakam is back on the tour circuit and kicking it hard. The man from Pikeville, Kentucky’s assembled a mighty touring unit and is setting fans afire from Austin to Salinas. The set’s about to become hotter come August 24 when Dwight’s newest compilation Top Ten (New West) drops.

The tracks are drawn from the golden age of Dwight Yoakam, circa 1986-1993 and there’s not a dog in the lot. They also offer a timely reminder on the almighty impact Yoakam’s sound had on the direction of country music. Sporting painted-on jeans, Manuel jackets, a low-slung white Stetson and a punchy, authentic hillbilly sound, Dwight Yoakam rocked into the mainstream with a girl catching swagger, then turned around and moved the traditionalists over to his side with his evocative song writing and electrifying performances.

From the guitar riff of his very first single “Honky Tonk Man” off his very first album Guitars, Cadillacs, etc., etc; the dude was serving notice we were in the presence of something special. Twenty fours years later Top Ten rightly kicks off with the title track and Honky Tonk Man, from that genre bustin’ debut.

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