Features

Changing the Model of Symphony Orchestra Management

By Rob Tomaro, Classical Music Editor of Cashbox Magazine

Fallout from the downturn has orchestra managers reeling.   Even before the economy went south, the traditional management model was creaking with age and leaking at the seams.  Something had to be done, and it took a perfect storm to put change into motion.

The elements of this storm collided at the outset of 2008: the graying of the audience, diminishing sponsorship, decreasing audience numbers, and increasing competition for consumer entertainment dollars.  Then, in a coup de gras, the stock market tumbled and orchestra endowments from Maine to Oregon  doubled over and yelled for mama.  We're just beginning to dig ourselves out from under the rubble.

But good things have come out of it. Smart Boards realized they had an opportunity to tighten up an outmoded management model and bring it into this century.

Johnnie Lovesin: 50 years of Rock ‘n’ Roll

By Bill Delingat

Johnnie Lovesin, the Veteran rocker from Val D'Or, Quebec, got his start in the mid-1960's when he moved to Toronto to what would become the hub of the flower power scene in Toronto‘s Yorkville. Johnnie spent much of his time pan- handling, busking for change and playing with whoever would listen and most bands did.

By the mid 70’s Johnnie was known as  'Crazy John' Lovesin and he was planning to form a band called “Black Ballet”.With his charisma and  smile, he gained the attention of the promoters of  some of the biggest rock festivals around,  becoming a popular figure backstage at arena events. Several bands later ,Johnnie went on to call himself the “Ace from Space” and formed his now legendary show,” Johnnie Lovesin And The Invisible Band” and caught the attention of  cutting edge promoters “The Garys”.

The Boogie Man's Back

Alan Gerber

By Bill Delingat

Alan Gerber was born in the windy city of Chicago; both his mother and father were music lovers, his mother played the piano and his father enjoyed singing. Alan's older sister became quite talented as a pianist and there was always a baby grand piano in the house for Alan to experiment on.

Alan credits his two uncles for inspiring him to get into the music field as they both also played the piano and loved the jazz and blues, although they never played professionally. Alan enjoyed jamming with his uncles as a kid and also credits the Chicago scene for getting him hooked on playing.

O Canada ! There are Stars on King

Cover September 11, 2010

By Sandy Graham

The concept for a Walk of Fame in Toronto, to honour famous Torontonians was first conceived in 1996, by founder and current President, Peter Soumalias. The Board of the Toronto Entertainment District Association was not keen on the idea, so Soumalias went on to create and establish The Walk of Fame for Canadians in partnership with Bill Ballard, Dusty Cohl and Gary Slaight. In spite of a lack of funds, research and no media plan, they managed to succeed and the first class of inductees was inducted in 1998. The Walk of Fame has since become a popular tourist attraction in Toronto and has been named the number one Canadian recognition event.

No More Buggy Whips

WCMA looks at bright side of music biz

By Karen Bliss

The Western Canadian Music Alliance, made up of five industry associations Alberta Music, Manitoba Music, Music BC, Music Yukon and SaskMusic, is taking a more proactive, positive direction for the topics at the 2009 WCMA conference in Brandon, Manitoba, Sept. 17 to 20.

“A lot of the organizations, including ours, have talked a lot about ‘the sky is falling,’ and all this terrible stuff, and we decided this year that that’s over,” explains Rick Fenton, executive director of the WCMA. 

“The way we start the conference guide is ‘Congratulations: you’ve survived the recession, illegal downloading, a massive downturn in CD sales, major label restructuring and the erosion of the concept of intellectual property and despite all this you are making a living in the music biz,’” recounts Fenton.

Meet The Music Maestro Rob Tomaro

By Sandy Graham

Dr. Robert Tomaro is an award-winning composer, musician, recording artist and symphonic conductor. He is in his tenth year as Music Director and Conductor for the Beloit Janesville Symphony Orchestra and is executive producer on numerous CD's with the BJSO. Prior to the BJSO, he founded the Elysian Symphony Orchestra in New Jersey, where he served as Music Director.

Dr. Tomaro holds the Shogren Family Conducting Chair as Professor of Music at Beloit College in Wisconsin and is a member of Kappa Delta Pi and Pi Kappa Lambda, the national honor societies in education and music education, and a winner of the New Jersey Council on the Arts Fellowship Award for Symphonic Composition.  In 1991, he was appointed as an Honorary Member of the Board of Directors of the Association Nationale de Musique de Chambre in Paris.

Blue Peter's TIFF Debut

By Bill Delingat

When the amount of hairspray you had in your guaff and when the bigger the amps ruled the music scene, there was a movement in the UK where anyone could play and be part of the scene called “Punk”. A branch off of a more sophisticated sound emerged from this movement called “New Wave” with bands like Roxy Music, Japan and in the United States, Blondie and the Cars, and in Canada Blue Peter led the pack.

In the mid 70’s Chris Wardman and Paul Humphrey started to write and perform with what would become the nucleus of ‘Blue Peter”. In 1979 they were signed to Ready records and in 1980 their first full length LP “Radio Silence” was released.

Now some 30 years later “Blue Peter” is back with a debut performance at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Blue Peter will be performing as part of “TIFF Live from Dundas Square” on Friday Sept. 11 at 8:15 pm.

Neil Young's peers happy the Canadian rocker finally getting due from Grammy

Cover August 21, 2009

By Nick Patch, The Canadian Press
LOS ANGELES - When Grammy gives its person of the year award to Neil Young this weekend, a star-studded cast of performers will be on hand to serenade the Toronto-born rock legend.

Sheryl Crow, Elton John, James Taylor, k.d. lang and John Mellencamp are just a few of the names who will perform at Friday's MusiCares gala, and who will presumably have a chance to meet the elusive singer/songwriter.

Many Canadian artists who hold Young up as a Canuck icon still haven't had the pleasure.

"I've always wanted to meet him," Stompin' Tom Connors told The Canadian Press in a recent interview.

"He's got a great name for himself throughout the world and he's well thought of back here in Canada. I'm looking forward to meeting him someday.

"If you see him before I do, let him know that I'd be willing to meet him, sit down and have a few beers."

He's not the only one.

Syndicate content