Reviews

My Mother’s Lesbian Jewish Wiccan Wedding

by Ron Bennison

Performances Resume February 26, 2010

First Block of Tickets Now On Sale for Performances Until March 21, 2010

Venue: The Panasonic Theatre – 651 Yonge St. Toronto (just south of Bloor)

My Mother's Lesbian Jewish Wiccan Wedding returned to The Panasonic Theatre February 26th, 2010 to a sold out house. It was first performed in July 2009 at the Bread & Circus Theatre in Kensington market as part of the Toronto Fringe Festival where it was discovered by David Mirvish, expanded and launched in the Panasonic theatre the Mirvish 2009-2010 season.

Darrelle London: Edible Word Parade

Darelle London

Unsigned

This 9-song collection is loaded with offbeat pop appeal. Farm girl London writes and performs on piano and while she cites Carole King as an influence, a much more apparent one is Tory Amos, in reference to song structure and offbeat arrangements.

The songs carry sharp observations sheathed in whimsical almost spontaneous sounding melody lines and breezy delivery a la Lily Allen.

The sweetness of the voice and childlike overtones is at once engaging and disarming to the point where it's easy to miss stuff first time around. Much of the lyric is at variance with the shiny, happy surface wrapping and only this tension keeps some songs from being a touch too precious.

Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein

By Ron Bennison


Closing out the 2009/2010 Mirvish subscription season, this production opened March 17 and runs until April 18, 2010. 
 Venue: The Princess of Wales Theatre – 300 King St. West  Toronto, Ontario

Warning:  Strobe lights are used in this production.  Recommended for ages 12 and older. 

REVMATIC: Cold Blooded Demon

Revmatic

Fist Records

This is not exactly a new album but representative of the kind of good work that cane be passed over in the rush to the next big thang.

Cold Blooded Demon is the third album from this Kingston are foursome who over 9 years has refined a catchy mix of vintage Metallica, commercial hard rock and Southern fried grooves.

From the opening blast of Head My Way to the pin ya to the wall power of She’s A Drug and Lie To Love Me, as unlikely a romantic twosome as you could hope for, Revmatic exhibit a balls-out confidence that works in getting even the weaker tunes into the club.

Lotsa fuzzed out guitars and fist pumping anthems, the standout in the regard being Bad Behaviour and for all the overwhelming power, there a commercial sensibility here that’s responsible for some good hooks such as on Lie To Me and the title track.

BASIA BULAT: Heart Of My Own

Basia

Secret City Records

Never mind the obvious differences, there’s a track on this album called “Gold Rush’ that’s a significant clue to what this collection’s all about. More than anything else, it resonates best with Neil Young’s “After The Gold Rush” in terms of scope, ambition and a unique approach to pushing the form forwards.

The tunes here are largely shaped by Bulat’s imagined idea of a mythic Yukon before she’d ever set eyes on the place and the fact they were all written on the road, a new experience for Bulat. Even the ones not overtly Yukon-influenced carry an ambience of re-imagined times and places.

THEE SILVER MT.ZION MEMORIAL ORCHESTRA

Constellation

Kollaps Tradixionales
Constellation

And Godspeed You! Black Emperor begat Thee Silver Mt. Zion Traditional Orchestra and it went on to give itself lo, a different name for each album and yeah, many players came and went but 15-minute songs remained unto this, Thee Silver’s sixth album.

Kollaps Tradixionales comes with a different name and the usual line-up changes but it’s unmistakably the work of main man Efrim Menuck and his band of punked-out experimentalists. The lineup’s down to one guitar now but in fact Kollaps... contains some of the heaviest guitar moments from the band to dat

A BOY CALLED NEWFOUNDLAND

March 26 - April 11, 2010
Tickets on sale now!
TarragonTheatre.com 30 Bridgman Avenue

Multi Dora Award-nominated Theatre Smash is thrilled to present the world premiere of Cape Breton-born playwright Graeme Gillis' A BOY CALLED NEWFOUNDLAND, a dark and quirky family comedy directed by Ashlie Corcoran, running March 26 to April 11 at Tarragon Theatre's Extra Space.

Patrick Kwok-Choon plays Newfoundland "Flounder" Willow, an awkward 15-year-old cadet. A loner who is scared of being alone, his life revolves around his family, his synthesizer, his French-camp love Evelyn, and his parents' family business - The Romantic Times, a self-published newspaper. When his mother returns home from her second honeymoon without her husband, Newfoundland and his sisters struggle to recreate the family and home they once knew.

THE MILL: Part Three: THE WOODS

TheatreFront.com
The productions are outright superb" National Post
March 18-April 3, 2010
YoungCentre.ca

Award-winning company THEATREFRONT continues their ghost story serial, THE MILL, with Part Three: THE WOODS, written by Tara Beagan and directed by Sarah Stanley.

A Canadian horror story, THE WOODS takes place in 1640, two centuries before Part One and Part Two. The mill does not yet exist. The woods conceal a First Nations burial ground; the former site of a Wendat (Huron) settlement decimated by the imported ideals, and epidemics, of the French settlers.

Sophie Berkal-Sarbit

Young & Foolish

Young & Foolish is comprised of twelve tracks, which include “I’m Gonna Live ‘Til I Die” by Hoffman/Kent/Curtis.

MySpace.com/sophieberkalsarbit

Susan Boyle: Dreams Really Do Come True – Just Have Faith & Believe

I Dream a Dream

By Natasha Slinko

It is said that dreams do come true, and on January 21st 2009, Scottish-born Susan Boyle took one extraordinary leap of faith to achieve her dream by stepping completely out of her comfort zone, auditioning for Britain’s Got Talent to follow her one true passion – singing.

'I Dreamed A Dream’, a song made famous by the Andrew Lloyd Weber musical Les Misérables, was Boyle’s song of choice.

Boyle stepped onto the stage, only to be ridiculed by the judges and the audience alike, as they assumed and promptly judged a book by its cover, disvaluing anything else that was present, such as the human heart and the human spirit. How brave and resilient she was in the light of their scorn.

Then history was made as Boyle began to sing “I dream a dream in time gone by, when hope was high, and life worth living. I dreamed that love would never die, I dreamed that God would be forgiving…” You could have heard a pin drop.

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